Friday, January 28, 2005

Answering some of the previous posts' comments

Mister Ghost
That description was for a typical day in our ordinary life before the war. I hope I could find time to describe a typical day after the war. Because my daughters have a break now and I can't find time to work on the computer.
Yes, we tried pancakes but with honey, we don't have maple syrup, it is delicious anyway. Thank you.


Blake
The residency for junior doctor in Iraq, consists of 6 days a week, 24 hrs a day. Only one day off each week. they should stay in the hospital all the time, but not necessarily in the ward. Only when they are on call, they have to be ready for any emergency.
Nowadays, it is unsafe to stay in the hospital all the time, so every hospital made a special arrangements to minimize the working hours for the employees.
About the rice, it is basmati long grain and white.
Thank you very much.


strykeraunt
Hi, Thank you for your stop to read my post.
I have been in the USA and I had an idea that the people there were open minded and civilized in a away that the personal thinking and ideas have no effect on their relationship. That was 25 year ago, I still hope that it is still working any way. Specially if you put yourself in Najma's shoes and see what she saw and hear what she hear in daily bases. If you had two nephews serving in Iraq, she have many relatives, neighbors, and persons she used to see them every days killed or injured during the time when the American were supposed to keep the civilians safe.
Thank you again for your hope, the details of our journey to Baghdad, you can read it at Najma's blog.


Papa Ray
Thank you for your greetings, I am totally with you that our life will never be the same as it used to be. But I don't believe that my life will be any better in the future, I am 57 years old, and I have to go to work every day (this carries a very high probability of being killed in your way). In addition, in the last 18 months, the progress is almost always in the negative direction. I only care for my daughters, can they manage it alone?
The assay about The war against WW IV, was too long for me to complete, and full of political terms I didn't understand. So i am sorry for not reading it in full.


Salvador
What you read about al-salam hospital is correct.
But my personal opinion, they took it temporarily for safety purposes, not as a headquarter.
It is the city biggest hospital and the only general hospital in the left bank of Tigris. The patients and the medical staff were driven out. The medical staff were prevented from entering the hospital again.
All the appliances and medicines are still in the hospital, ( that mean it is a temporary action) maybe till the date of elections.

To those who want to know about the condition of the hospitals in general after the war.!!
Before the war, we were living in a very severe and strict sanction, inhuman and illogical in any way, eg. Most of the drugs are forbidden, they prevent the sublingual trinitrate used for angina. Because it contain nitrare(an explosive materials).
So any thing will look better than before. But is it like what everybody hoped from a local hospital? definitely not. There is a great improvement in the outlook of the building, they repaired it and painted it, now they started supplying it with new furniture.
We had a lot of the medical staff fled, for many reasons, the most important: safety and security
of their lives, a lot have been killed, for no reason other than to make them fled. Not only the medical staff but also the scientists of different specialties.


Anonymous at 5:32 AM.
Thank you sir, I found thequestingcat.com blog very interesting. And I really believe, if all the American soldiers are open minded like him there will be no war between the Iraqis and the Americans. the way that we feel here that the American soldiers are doing their job, and they don't have other choice. At the beginning of the occupation there were some communication between the Iraqis and the American soldiers, but this was ended totally (at least in Mosul) when peoples saw in the medias and heard from the people arrested by the Americans about the way they treated them. To be a good citizen you have to obey the law, But what to do when there is no law..?

33 comments:

Papa Ray said...

Greetings, I am glad to see your words again.

I hope this finds you and yours healthy and safe.

Thirty seven years ago, I was a young man almost still a teenager in years, but many years older because of war. There were days and weeks that I felt that I was already dead. Dead, but allowed to continue to suffer and to kill. I hated it, I wanted nothing more than to go home and forget all the destruction and death.

I remember thinking many times, this wasn't my war, this isn't my country. But then, I would talk with the people that I was there to help and they would tell me that anything would be better than being ruled by the North, having their freedoms taken away.

I would ask, "Isn't this war, this struggle too much for you, is it really worth it? So many have died. So much has been destroyed, is it worth it?

To a man, they all said, YES it is.

Then as you know, we were forced to leave by our Government's lack of faith, lack of backbone and lack of support by the people of my country.

I have always felt such anger and guilt over this. I still can not fully forgive and forget.

But, I can tell you this, and you must believe me. If you survive, your life and your daughters lives will be better, much better,as will the lives of your grand children and their children.

But only under a fair and just government. That is why American Warriors and your Iraqi Warriors must continue the fight and win. In the big picture, it will be the turning point (a free Iraq) in the future of the Middle East and give notice to all the thugs and terrorists that their day is coming. It will not happen in just a few months, but over a period of years, but it will happen.

The enemies of freedom (everyones enemies) can run and hide but they will be hunted, found and destroyed.

Here is something written by one of our most loved and famous American Presidents. I think, that it fits this terrible but hopeful period in your NATION OF IRAQ.

-----------------------------------------------------
Abraham Lincoln: Gettysburg Address
November 19, 1863
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, USA

"Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal".

"Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this".

"But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate, we cannot consecrate, we cannot hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead who struggled here have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain, that this nation under God shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth".


Papa Ray
West Texas
USA

Anonymous said...

"But then, I would talk with the people that I was there to help and they would tell me that anything would be better than being ruled by the North, having their freedoms taken away. I would ask, "Isn't this war, this struggle too much for you, is it really worth it? So many have died. So much has been destroyed, is it worth it? To a man, they all said, YES it is."

Did you ask them in your language or their language? How do you know they felt free to express their real opinions?

Anonymous said...

IRAQ: WELCOME GENERATION-CHOICEMAKER

Man is earth's Choicemaker. He is by nature and nature's
God a creature of Choice - and of Criteria. His unique and
definitive characteristic is, and of Right ought to be, the
natural foundation of his environments, institutions, and
respectful relations to his fellow-man. Thus, he is oriented
to a Freedom whose roots are in the natural Order of the
universe.

an American Choicemaker

Mirco said...

to Anonymous:
How did he and many other know that they tell the truth?
Because after the South fall under the North, many millions escaped in all way available to them from South Viet-Nam.
I remember, in the 1978-79, the italian military ships heading there (with many others) to rescue these men, women, child, in high waters.
Many died, by water, by pirates, by famine,...
Many now live here, in Italy, as many other live in other countries around the world that welcome them seeking freedom for themselves and their children.

strykeraunt said...

My thoughts and prayers are with the citizens of Mosul and Iraq during your countries first democratic election. The world watches...

Anonymous said...

>to Anonymous:
>How did he and many other know that they tell the truth?

I asked how did he know they were expressing their true OPINIONS.... NOT THE TRUTH. There is a difference between opinions and facts.

>Because after the South fall under the North, many >millions escaped in all way available to them from >South Viet-Nam.

I think this is exaggerated. got any references?

Papa Ray said...

Here is a start for reference South Vietnam refugees

http://tinyurl.com/6x3gc

There are many more, if your that interested, which I know you are not.


It is a great day for the people of Iraq. Congratulations on your first step to Democracy.

Papa Ray
West Texas
USA

just me said...

Congatulations. May the future be a little brighter now for you, your family and your country.

Albert Li said...

Hello Truth Teller,

Did you vote today? I saw the TV news, a lot people went to vote there......

Have a fabulous day!

Jeff said...

Dr. Truth Teller:

I hope you are feeling better. Some physicians I have known don't do what they tell their patients to do in order to take care of themselves.

I hope you will take care of yourself and get well quickly.

Jeff

Truth teller said...

Thank you Jeff
I am thinking to write a post about how Iraqi patients suffer during the last 20 years by telling my health story.

free0352 said...

I have read you and your daughter’s blog and hope you enjoyed your trip to Baghdad. I was pleased to see there were relatively few civilian casualties during the election. I fought in your country in 2003 during the invasion and assure you we did everything that we could to protect Iraqis from the looting that went on, though there wasn’t enough to stop it. We tried to protect your future economy. In truth we didn’t have enough protection for you because we didn’t expect that type of thing to go on. We were only prepared to fight the Iraqi Army and paramilitary forces and were not trained to act as police, nor did we expect or prepare for such a mission. This was poor intelligence and planning and we in the service’s fault. Now at this time, there are far more Iraqis than us and because of this it is hard to keep the peace, but we in the United States Military and we do the best that we can. Many in Iraq seem to think that the United States is all powerful and our failures are not so, but of deliberate design. This is of course not true, we put our pants on one leg at a time same as you, that is to say; we are not perfect and are fallible as all men are. It is hard to understand our methods if you are not familiar with them, and there seems to be little dialogue between the troops and Iraqi civilians there on the ground, due to mutual fear. Hopefully one day this will change. I think in five years you will not recognize your own country, and the progress will be amazing. These things take time, but not as much as you think. Look to Germany and Japan to see historically how my nation treats those whom it occupies. I will be traveling to Baghdad late this spring to begin my second combat tour. I hope it is as peaceful as possible, and I also hope now that Iraqis are represented by the leaders they have finally chosen that a new spirit of cooperation can begin. Further, I look forward to your own country’s police and military taking the burden of the mission from us and for Iraq to be the first and most successful Arab democracy in the Middle East. You have a unique opportunity to lead the way for both Islam and Arabs globally, and I trust the Iraqis with guiding your part of the Earth into a new era of prosperity and freedom.

Anonymous said...

not enough of our soldiers getting shot in the streets for you, sir? The Iraqis had saddam, now they have terrorists who's idea of a good governmnet is the taliban. So they can choose between Saddam, the Taliban, or democracy. They should embrace one or the other, it's quite unfair to the other parties for them to wait around deciding.

strykeraunt said...

Truthteller,

I am looking forwrd to your next story...

emigre said...

Dear Teller (Truths)

You have a great blog. Very Telling. It's nice to know there are such sound eyes and ears out there writing about what is going on where we are not.

Thank you very very mush.

free0352 said...

Hey Americans, there isn’t any point leaving American quotes on Iraqi blogs. Think how lucky in a way, Iraqi’s are. Standing at the threshold of the birth of a new nation, Iraqi’s RIGHT NOW get to say the great, true, and brave things that history will look back on as great.

Anonymous said...

I have found it interesting to see the many different views of the current Iraqi situation from Iraqis. It is very easy to determine who belonged to Sadamn's regime (Sunni) and those who did not. From this writer's apparent postition and relative comfort, I believe it is safe to say he is Sunni and sees little to gain from a democratic revolution and the terrible price being paid to secure it by Iraqi's or Coalition forces. Others who sufferred in every way under the Baathists seem to be far more positive and hopeful. If I interpret this writers position, I apologize. But afte reading his commnets and those of many others in Iraq, I believe my observations to be accurate in the majority of instances.

Jeff said...

Dear Anonymous Above:

Why are you anonymous? This gentleman is no friend of Saddam and anyone who has read his and his family's blogs knows that.

Some of the best and wisest people in Iraq are Sunnis. Some of them are even very pro-war, like the Fadhil brothers, all Sunnis. The President of Iraq is a Sunni. The King of Iraq overthrown in 1959 was a Sunni.

So don't be blind.

Jeff

Jeff said...

Dr. Truth Teller:

I saw a story about the final voting picture in Mosul. It's supposed to be written by a Mosuli. But what it said about the final voter turnout surprised me.

If you are curious and have time, I wonder if you could give me your impression?

http://www.friendsofdemocracy.info/
2005/02/80_percent_turn.html

MotherofMany said...

Just wanted to say thank-you for taking the time to post about your city and your lives before the war. I'm very interested in learning more about the Iraqi people. I wish you all the best.

I appreciate you sharing information about your customs and culture. I'll be back to read more when you can post. I have daughters, too, so I know how hard it can be to get the computer!

Truth teller said...

Jeff

We have an election center few hundred meters from our house. The total number who went for voting can be calculated with one hand's fingers.
In some centers at the periphery of the town, there were a lot of voters, the reason for that is the kurd from outside Mosul, they came to the city to vote again in Mosul. It occured in multiple centers specially after noon. Nobody checked for the ink stained fingers. This is for two logical reasons:

1- Increase the nomber of Kurds registered in Mosul..!!!
2- To have a noticeable percentage of participation in the election. Any way, I guess the percentage would not exceed the 10 % any way.I am not sure but that was my impression, based on my relatives, neighbors, and people I know. Definitly there is no chance for Allawi to get any good results in Mosul.

Faisal ... said...

Salaam Truth Teller

Just passing-by to send my regards. Insha-Allah things will get better in Iraq.

Anonymous said...

Dear Jeff,

I posted anonymously before and now because my first effort to register a name seemed to be unsuccessful..and let's face it, you are only marginally less anonymous. I had no intention of posting more than once. I have no doubt that there are many wise, courageous Sunni Iraqis. But if you are as astute an observer as you seem to think, you must notice the difference, generally speaking, in the postings of an Iraqi Kurd and a Sunni. I have made it a point to ask when reading Iraq blogs. I have a daughter serving in Mosul and she has noted how parts of Mosul are seemingly prosperous while others live in the most abject poverty within yards. Why is that? Because the affluent are predominantly Sunnis who were the primary members of the ruling class under the tyrannical regime. It certainly isn't an observation unique to me that the Iraqi groups opposing democracy are almost exclusivley Sunni and stand to lose when the vicously oppressed minority express their wishes. The author of this blog seems quite bitter and negative about elections and the effort. Hard to find a similiar view if reading blogs by Kurds, Christian, or Shiites. These Iraqis who complain get little sympathy from me. If not a friend of Sadam, what has he done before or now to oppose him? Complains about no security, rigged elections, behavior of American troops---not only he is trying to contribute to a solution, he can't even walk a couple of blocks to vote. Dangerous, yes--my daughter had sniper bullets come withing 3 feet of her on election day, but she did her duty and stood for all those who had the courage to go vote, of which she saw many. Didn't stop a majority of Kurds, Christians, Shiites, and I'll bet, some courageous Sunnis. Like my daughter, they did their duty.

Jeff said...

Well, Anonymous, my name is Jeff, as it says in my post. My name is in fact Jeffrey Kantor. So before I wasn't anonymous at all and now I am SUPER not anonymous. You however still remain cloaked in mystery. Can't you even write your name in the comment box like others with the problems you recount do? When roundly insulting someone, it seems like the honorable thing to do.

I think your generalizations are foolish and clumsy. I can easily think of one Shia blogger, Faiza, who was suspicious of the elections and is angry about what Americans are doing in Iraq. And we fought a pitched battle with Sadr's militia not so long ago; there was much popular support for him, and all from among the Shia. Sadr City was the most dangerous place in Baghdad.

The Shia and Kurds have nothing to lose from elections. Most Sunni are not rich, but have to wonder if they might not suffer under a vengeful majority who will want to make Sunnis suffer because Saddam and his families were Sunnis.

Did you look at Ahmed's blog? Najma's uncle? He voted and happily. Did you see another very nice blogger in Baghdad who calls herself Rose voted and was overjoyed. Do you think the Iraq the Model guys, all Sunnis, would agree with your harsh condemnation of Sunnis in general? What should the Sunni have done under Saddam? Should they all have committed mass suicide because they were the same religion as Saddam? Or is it okay that they could still be, for example Doctors, like Truth Teller.

Why should not Dr. Truth Teller call the shots as he sees them? I can't speak for him, but he sounds like he is 1.) Happy Saddam is gone, 2.) Suspicious of general American intentions, 3.) Upset at what American firepower has done to neighbors and relatives, 4.) Upset at the CHAOS that descended on Iraq and frustrated that it hasn't been solved (who wouldn't be?). But he is also unfailingly polite and moderate, kind and generous and careful about what he says.

I just don't see what you have to complain about. Keep reading and you just might learn something; unless you know everything already. But if you have to comment, why not be polite, even if you disagree? And why not leave your name if you can't be polite?

Or is a person who implies that people should risk their lives to vote too lacking in courage to say who they are?

Jeff

Jeff said...

Well, Anonymous, my name is Jeff, as it says in my post. My name is in fact Jeffrey Kantor. So before I wasn't anonymous at all and now I am SUPER not anonymous. You however still remain cloaked in mystery. Can't you even write your name in the comment box like others with the problems you recount do? When roundly insulting someone, it seems like the honorable thing to do.

I think your generalizations are foolish and clumsy. I can easily think of one Shia blogger, Faiza, who was suspicious of the elections and is angry about what Americans are doing in Iraq. And we fought a pitched battle with Sadr's militia not so long ago; there was much popular support for him, and all from among the Shia. Sadr City was the most dangerous place in Baghdad.

The Shia and Kurds have nothing to lose from elections. Most Sunni are not rich, but have to wonder if they might not suffer under a vengeful majority who will want to make Sunnis suffer because Saddam and his families were Sunnis.

Did you look at Ahmed's blog? Najma's uncle? He voted and happily. Did you see another very nice blogger in Baghdad who calls herself Rose voted and was overjoyed. Do you think the Iraq the Model guys, all Sunnis, would agree with your harsh condemnation of Sunnis in general? What should the Sunni have done under Saddam? Should they all have committed mass suicide because they were the same religion as Saddam? Or is it okay that they could still be, for example Doctors, like Truth Teller.

Why should not Dr. Truth Teller call the shots as he sees them? I can't speak for him, but he sounds like he is 1.) Happy Saddam is gone, 2.) Suspicious of general American intentions, 3.) Upset at what American firepower has done to neighbors and relatives, 4.) Upset at the CHAOS that descended on Iraq and frustrated that it hasn't been solved (who wouldn't be?). But he is also unfailingly polite and moderate, kind and generous and careful about what he says.

I just don't see what you have to complain about. Keep reading and you just might learn something; unless you know everything already. But if you have to comment, why not be polite, even if you disagree? And why not leave your name if you can't be polite?

Or is a person who implies that people should risk their lives to vote too lacking in courage to say who they are?

Jeff

Jeff said...

Thank your for the information, Doctor. I'm guessing your idea is much closer to being right, most of the things I read agree with you. But then I read that one thing that said 80% in Mosul and I thought I would ask you since you are there.

Thanks again. I hope you will find time and energy to post again soon.

Jeff

Anonymous said...

THE Jeff? How silly to claim that because you leave your name, real or not, makes you any less anonymous. Now you know me as anonymous so you know me as well as I do you. How courageous I would be if only I could write my name!That is a silly argument as is your analysis of my personal courage. As I said, I didn't get a screen name because the first two attempts were unsuccessful and the value of having a screen name was very limited as I had no intention of posting further. Until you engaged me in this discussion.

I suppose my observations could be all wrong. But I come by my opinions from listening and reading the observations of many, all of whom are in a position to know far more than I do.
Although I recently spent 9 mos in Mosul myself and a year in Kuwait and Southern Iraq several years before, I was unable to leave the base I was on as a civilian and don't pretend that that makes me knowledgeable about the people of the city. But it does mean I have some interest and I've spent some time reading and engaging others who may. The vast majority seem to think that the Sunnis who made up the bulk of the ruling class under Saddam are the most reluctant to support democracy and make up the small indigenous insurgency almost exclusively.

I acknowledge now, as before, that there are doubtless many courageous, hard working, hopeful Sunnis among the population. Perhaps even a majority, and this blogger may very well be one of them. But I read his account of his election experience within minutes of reading my daughter's. She was, and remains, proudly among the US soldier's in Mosul putting their lives on the line to rid Iraq of the insurgents, rebuild, and give Iraqi's a voice.When not standing guard, she sometimes gets to use her training as a medic by providing some health care to locals who come to her base which gives her satisfaction. She'd rather be home and have Iraqi men and women step up to the challenge, and has admiration for those that do. She came within 3 feet of possibly giving her life toward that cause when a sniper took a couple of shots at her on election day.

She is gratified by the effort of the majority of Iraqis to take advantage of that opportunity, and many of the Iraqi National Guard who bravely did their parts. Then you have Iraqi men such as this who criticize and hide away. Do I expect all to risk everything for a decent future for their families? No, but I respond when I read criticism.

Any Iraqi posting in on a blog from Mosul during this time has got to be willing to engage in such discussion. It would be naive in the extreme to think many would have interest otherwise. If this man has done anything to help secure his city and help his fellow citizens to take control of his city, I missed it and would love to hear about it. He complains about how American firepower has harmed his city. I wonder how much he complained when the Republican Guard murdered 100's of thousands of Kurds in his area? All I know is that he couldn't walk several hundred yards to go vote while others died for his opportunity to participate. Forgive me for not congratulating him.

I hope for a free and prosperous Iraq so he can tell his grandchildren that in the fight for Iraq he criticized and compained about those who made it happen. That is liberty and the US is full of people who take advantage of their freedom in much the same way. Isn't it great?

aNarki-13 said...

Dear Anon above (You know who u r!)

Umm.. let me just ask a question:
When was it known as a fact that Shi'a are a majority and Sunni are a minority?
Who sponsored this claim?
As I browsed through ALL of my personal Identification Documents (issued during and AFTER the reign of saddam)
I found out that there is NOTHING AT ALL to show if you're a sunni or shi'a.. it just tells if you're a muslim or christian, it doesnt state your sect..

Now.. ok you say Shi'a are a majority and they have suffered under Saddam.. well, Surprise, Sunni have suffered too.

It is said there haven't been any high-ranking shi'a officials till NOW, well it is a known fact that THE FIRST PRIME MINISTER OF IRAQ WAS FROM THE SADR FAMILY.
and many other prime ministers after that till the reign of saddam began.. During his reign it didnt matter if you were prime-minister or a beggar, you'd still have the same weight in decision-making, that is: NULL, ZERO.
So saddam was a xenophobic criminal.. he didnt do those things to shi'a because he was SUNNI, he did them because he doesnt want ANYONE to stand up to him.
my anonymous friend.. you base your arguments on stats taken from FOX news and other NON-Iraqi sources.
take a tour around the political history of iraq and you'll find many more facts hidden under tons of dust!

the people benifiting from Saddam are his tribe and its affiliates, NOT Sunni people as a whole.

please refrain from labeling people.. Saddam used to do that.

thank you again, now you can rip me a new one!
Cheers!

Anonymous said...

Ana,

I would never rip anyone who lists Texas Flood as being among his favorite songs. I agree that labels are often unfair, but when speaking of generally accepted facts, they are often useful. You can't possibly be proposing that every writer and speaker I have heard on the subject of sectarian tensions among Muslims in Iraq have got it wrong? Is it true that many of the parties which stood for election were based on sectarian beliefs and that the Sunni sponsored parties appear to have the majority of votes? If I have this wrong and you have some facts with which to correct me, I would genuinely appreciate your enlightening me.

Truth teller said...

Jeff, anonymous, and AnaRKi13
i tried to comment on your comments. But it was too long . so I decided to post it separately.

aNarki-13 said...

hehe!
Your words are true enough, my anonymous friend, maybe I wasn't able to communicate myself very clearly, all I meant was that in Iraq we never thought about Sunni and Shi'a as minority/majority or terrorist/patriot or any other kind of thinking that actually seperates the two groups into two distinct factions warring for control over this dump..
until the surfacing of all those Zarqawi-esque actions that, believe it or not, are condemned by Sunni before Shi'a because it helps to achieve nothing except chaos and mindless death.
We do not support Zarqawi and his fellows more than you like him!
the ones who do are misguided, brainwashed SHEEP.
I say for the nth time, Islam is about PEACE. not slitting throats.

and I also believe that Stevie Ray was the only one ever capable of doing justice to Jimi Hendrix' Voodoo Chile!

regards.

Anonymous said...

THE anonymous--I had the honor of seeing Stevie Ray do Voodoo Child in a little place in Austin. One of my fondest memories. The man wailed for nearly 3 hours. Had to put superglue on his finger tips because they were bleeding form nonstop playing.

And thanks for explaining further.

慢慢來 said...

晚情徵信協會全國網
大愛徵信社
三立徵信社
離婚|離婚證人有限公司
離婚|離婚證人-高雄徵信同業工會
離婚|婚姻挽回專區
一品蒐證尋人器材網
全國女子徵信社
晚晴徵信
八大徵信社
離婚│華納徵信社
徵信社品質保障關懷協會
晚晴徵信協會全國網
溫馨法律諮詢
劈腿大剖析
全國優良婚姻挽回
法律諮詢|免費諮詢華陀
亞洲徵信總部
感情挽回全國徵信
鴻海徵信尋人免費諮詢法律諮詢
大陸抓姦二奶-法律諮詢社
三立徵信有限公司
大愛徵信社
離婚|離婚證人非凡有限公司
女人國際徵信社
中區嚴選聯合徵信網
女人國際徵信
大愛徵信有限公司-台中
婦幼徵信有限公司
女子偵探徵信團隊
離婚|外遇觀測站
法律諮詢|免費諮詢網
外遇抓猴徵信偵探社
離婚-感情挽回Q&A諮詢網
新浪私家偵探社
離婚|女人徵信社
離婚|女人私家偵探社
婚姻挽回│國際聯盟社
法律諮詢所
外遇抓姦|女人國際徵信
女子徵信社
外遇|抓姦-女子偵探全國入口網
全國優良女人徵信社